Watch this video if you want to sharpen your thinking skills!

Many people asked, consciously or not, about why should they write from the top of their heads, considering that they could find all the answers from the internet, and they could just copy all that & paste everything to a blank page. Well, guess what. For me, writing has been a way to overcome my social anxiety, and at the same time, writing has also become my way to express complicated things inside my mind, to build a story, and to become an architect of my own world. 😎

In this blog post though, I want to share with you a video that I stumbled upon when I was scrolling through YouTube recommendations —as per usual— about how writing can improve one’s ways of thinking. I can speak from experiences, that journaling and writing in general have allowed me to think a completely different way, which is more structured; and definitely helped me in figuring out what I really want with many things in life.

For that reason, I would love to share this video from Tim Ferriss. I hope this post can become a reason for someone’s first step, that may be from there, learning how to execute a better way of writing as well as thinking, can make us all a better person in general! 🎉

Henlo there 👋🏽 welcome back!

The video above explains this better, but let me try to summarize it.

For many people, a practice of writing is a way for them to freeze their thoughts so they can look at them in a different way, more transparent, and definitely by way of a better perspective. For many people, they wouldn’t be able to capture and freeze their thinking without writing. One would say that writing is the most important practice ever.

One of the main benefits of this practice is that it can help us sharpen our thinking. For example, observing when we’re using words that are not well defined, or when we’re saying things that we don’t actually need to say, should give us the feedback to get better at writing and saying things the next time we deliver and present ourselves.

■ Two scrappy pages every morning.

One of the easiest practices at improving our power to think is to get into the habit of writing. It says that the act of moving a pen on a paper with the aim of judging our ways of thinking, should help us taking our negative thoughts from our heads.

After doing this in one morning, we all can go along with the rest of our day knowing that we have put all our worries in a freeze-frame. And together with that, reviewing the words that we’ve written that morning can also allow us to see in which part in our lines of thinking where we are dull, and in which part we are sharp.

▬ The process.

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But of course, there is no mantra or magic trick that can help us get better at anything in one sitting. Therefore, you should take your time in doing this practice of writing morning pages, because only then you will start to notice the improvement in your overall delivery and presentation in life. For me personally, from coding to even writing blog posts, have been really helpful in getting a better and more settled lifestyle.

In this process, there are quite a lot of ways to improve our practice of writing. But first, maybe there’s one thing that you must know before all else: that 90 percent of writing is actually rewriting. For me personally, the point of understanding this belief is so that you shouldn’t be discouraged if at later times when you’d think that your writing is so shitty, or how your thought process is so messy as f*ck.

So this way, you can keep your progress on the positive track … well, at least I hope so.

▭ The three rounds technique.

One of our ways of improving our practice of writing is to revise our pieces every now and then. And in that process, there are two methods that can help you climb the step towards the fabulousness. First, there’s an approach known as the three rounds technique, which is the number of times you should judge your writing, and never overdo it.

  1. The first judge is yourself; meaning that here, you can judge your writing according to your own personal taste. There’s no right or wrong in this step, as long as you like how it turned out, then it’s all peachy and aight! ✨
  2. The second round is for the people who like what you write. These are the living creatures that are following your works, it’s either your parents, friends on social media, or even your cats who can’t even read anything —meaning that this step is totally optional in case you’re writing in a private journal, or something like that.
  3. The third round is for the critics. These are the people who will try to find the smallest mistakes in your writing. One way to get this point checked is that if you’re going to publish what you’ve been writing, you make sure to let your readers know that you’re open to criticism.

And now, for the second method of revising our pieces … cue the drumroll … is to make use of proofreaders! This can be people, to even computer programs that can highlight your mistakes.

▭ Proofreading.

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This time in the people category.

Just like how Time Ferriss explained in his video, the best kind of person to ask to proofread our pieces is lawyers. Lawyers are great critics because, according to him, they’re trained and skilled at looking at every word that you wrote, and at the same time, thinking about its meaning and predict how it will affect your readers. But in case you can’t found any lawyer around you, then it’s okay, you can ask anyone to proofread your writing.

You can aim to choose people that are not trained to proofread, but also make sure to ask them a few things. This is so you can still squeeze a few benefits from asking someone untrained to proofread your writings.

  • Ask them to highlight the stuff they find confusing;
  • Ask them to note the moment when their minds start to wander while they’re reading your pieces, so you can opt to take those part(s) out as the final product;
  • Ask them to indicate 10 percent of your writing that you should absolutely keep. But if they think there’s only a percentage that is worth keeping, then it’s okay too;
  • Ask them which part(s) they should cut off, approximately 10 to 20 percent. But if they think you should take out more than 20 percent, then tell them to f*ck off acknowledge their opinions, and make sure you remember that you’re the only one who makes the final decision.

I hope with all these approaches, especially on how writing and revising our pieces systematically, can help us all in becoming a good and skilled writer, and thinker at the same time. And together with that, also build us to become a better person. Let’s do our best, and good luck to you! 😊

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I'm gonna go ahead and end this blog post now. 🍂

[ . . . ]

While sharing this with you, I kept imagining that whoever you are reading this who hasn’t been able to write enough yet. As soon as you pick up a pen and a paper later, dedicating yourself to write for the first time … this practice should force you to really engage with your thoughts in a way that you’ve never experienced before. And to be honest, I would kill to relive that sort of sensations —where suddenly the greatest story structure just mapped inside your head, and suddenly becoming an author of a famous novel franchise sounds so awesome, and so you can’t wait to pursue that dream.

= ̄ω ̄=

Anyways, finally I can say now, “thanks a lot for reading my ramblings!”

In case you want to criticize my writings, feel free to do that in the comment section; if not, then make sure to hit the like button. 😏 I’ll see you when I see you next time! And oh, I think I have a post cooked up and ready to be published later today … so make sure to come back here again later today, or tomorrow —I dunno how time zone works!

Anyways, take care everyone!

Follow me on Twitter … twitter.com/nesha5971

“People can like what you write, they can dislike it, they can love it, they can hate it … but it should not confuse anybody.”

— American entrepreneur, Tim Ferriss.

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